This is good. Each of us, separately, confessed to the other that we ate it right out of the pot, leaning over the stove.

Tags: recipe source nyt

Always.

(Source: paid-for-free-wifi, via padnick)

Rough week at the house of Root Hog, with another critical family member taking his leave. Suppers won’t be the same, Quality Time on the Back Porch won’t be the same.

Last summer this was one of the last tunes my uncle played, on the porch in the sun, keeping up with the changes.

roxanegay:

How bad could that be?

How fun is that?

How’s that for easy?

How good does that look?

How good does this look?

Who could turn that down?

Isn’t that great?

Who wouldn’t want that for their birthday?

Who wouldn’t want that for his birthday?

We need a nice cocktail for breakfast, don’t we?

Who wouldn’t like that for breakfast?

ISN’T THAT FANTASTIC.

Nailed it.

Oh, Fall, you’re here? You’re here. And you brought pears! Excellent.

Two CSA weeks in a row see us pleasantly stuck with about 12-18 superb pears, nearing ripe in waves of two to four at a time. Most of the recipes in my books didn’t really give me the pear experience I wanted; they were all nice, but predicated on poaching the pears and then using them to garnish the cake or bread or sommmmmething. Tasty, I am sure, but I didn’t want to poach the pears. I thought of and rejected tarts with custard (a little more fuss than I wanted to go at today, despite having an ENTIRE DAMNED FREE LOVELY DAY with few, easy errands), and stumbled into this quick-bread-ish cake which also allows me to use nearly the rest of the buttermilk. Wonder of wonders.

I made the following changes, based on what was in the house, what I wanted, and what instincts I am slowly developing:
1. Lacking whole wheat pastry flour, I used 1/2 c whole wheat bread flour with 1 1/2 c all-purpose.
2. Lacking the will to grind oats to flour, I subbed hazelnut flour one-to-one. Because, bizarrely, it lurked in the freezer.
3. Spice mixture. Both cinnamon and allspice felt wrong to me, so I doubled the ginger, grated in about 1/2 tsp of nutmeg, and left the other stuff out.
4. Browned butter. I was surprised to see this get nearly no special mention in the recipe, as it’s simple but not easy, and in my experience easy to do wrong - or, more clearly put, to underdo. You really have to go nutty, you really have to watch the butter, and you have to be willing to wait just that extra bit more for it to be right. I think I didn’t let it go quite far enough, but I’m hoping it is a distinct flavor in there (underscored by the hazelnut flour. Noisette, indeed…).
5. More than doubled the pears. I fanned one whole pear out over the top of the loaf (with merely 1 TB of the suggested 3 turbinado) and also mixed a whole thinly sliced pear into the batter. Perhaps this was hubris. Perhaps this is disaster. We shall see when the 40-60 minutes (my bet’s in for 55) is up.

gentlemanbones:

These almond cookies are very aggressive.


I hope you saved the receipt for these so-called cookies.

gentlemanbones:

These almond cookies are very aggressive.

I hope you saved the receipt for these so-called cookies.

(Source: reddit.com, via lauramusich)

tally-art:

So cute

Us when we go to Kura next week. Exciiiiiiiited.

tally-art:

So cute

Us when we go to Kura next week. Exciiiiiiiited.

(Source: oamul, via padnick)

The Buttermilk Bundt cake is done and cooling, and I have a few tricks to share. Other than the tricks of middling food photography and an inability to bring he Tumblr app to heel vis a vis photo placement (text, photo, text, photo, text! Why is that hard? Dag).

I am devoted to mise en place, especially for baking. That’s not my trick, clearly, but I rely on it as I become a better baker. Also, that seltzer water was mine, it’s not for the cake. Nota bene. Also also, I didn’t have vegetable shortening so I just subbed in butter and hoped for the best.

But! There’s a hint to a trick in that photo. This cake called for juice of a lemon (3 TB), but says nothing about the zest. Buttermilk and lemon are pretty good friends, though, and I have Certain Needs, so what I did was to take the zest and rub it into the sugar intended for use in the cake. It smells like a lemon drop and I definitely picked this up from another lemon cake recipe. It really sings.

Not a trick but a source: Penzey’s for yer double strength vanilla. Picky Robin is picky.

Trick not pictured: crack all the eggs into a coffee mug so you can pour them in for the one-at-a-time addition required. Each yolk carries enough white in with it to make this work, and it’s so much easier than cracking eggs over the bowl. Which I’m pretty notoriously bad at.

Now a real trick, from a spice cake recipe. Backstory first: it’s my firm belief that there is only one suitable way to prep a baking pan. Generous butter, dusted with flour, tapped around evenly, excess dumped out. Baking spray is an abomination and silicon bakeware is a fiction. I have strong feelings. Anyway, for some Bundt cakes, I like to butter and then *sugar* the pan! with big rough crystals of turbinado sugar. It makes a glittery, sweet, even caramelized crackle on a cake that might otherwise look plain. Especially if one doesn’t have enough powdered sugar in the house, ahem-hem, to make a glaze. Ahem.

So that’s what I did. Recipe by the book, mostly, but for two tricks with the sugar. It baked to done (clean skewer) in ten minutes shorter than listed. I’ma go turn it out on a rack and cut it open before it is cooled, because I am very impatient and it smells amazing.

Tags: dessert

foodandwine:

© Con Poulos
Over-the-Top Dessert: Perfect for a summer party, this lemony Bundt cake is nicely browned on the outside, with a soft, tender crumb.
Recipe: Buttermilk Bundt Cake with Lemon Glaze

This is in the oven right now. My notes to come…

foodandwine:

© Con Poulos

Over-the-Top Dessert: Perfect for a summer party, this lemony Bundt cake is nicely browned on the outside, with a soft, tender crumb.

Recipe: Buttermilk Bundt Cake with Lemon Glaze

This is in the oven right now. My notes to come…

J made this tonight, and it just slayed. One of the things I don’t care for with most gazpacho is the fussiness surrounding what I always thought should be really easy. Easier than like bread, cucumbers, peppers, peeling chopping seeding and and and. This gets around all of that with a box grater, a blender, and a really short ingredient list. Which we of course made free and easy with, having no smoked olive oil on hand. Very good smoked paprika stood in wonderfully, and some pistachio oil added some just-past-olive flavor. We also added a couple peppadew peppers for fun. The almonds and grapes were delicious, but it might be even better if both of those ingredients made it into the soup itself, not just the garnish. Next time.

Getting really into baking - just in time for the height of summer, haw. 

I thought we’d missed rhubarb season this time around, but it turned out I was just under a misconception about when the season is. A bunch of rhubarb in our CSA share this week and a bunch last week meant we had to branch out from our usual best rhubarb cake recipe for maybe the first time ever. If we get more next week I’ll make a third cake. 

Exceptional Rhubarb Bundt Cake

3 1/2 - 4 c chopped rhubarb (1/2” chunks)
2 TB sugar
3 c unbleached flour
1 TB baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 c butter, softened
1 c brown sugar
3/4 c sugar
4 large eggs
1/2 c neutral oil (canola, vegetable…)
3 TB lemon juice
2 tsp vanilla
1/2 c whole milk
Powdered sugar or coconut icing, optional (as below)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.  Butter and flour a 3 qt Bundt pan, and set aside. 

Toss the chopped rhubarb with 2 TB sugar and set aside. 

Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl. Set, similarly, aside. 

In a large bowl, using a hand mixer or some serious whisking skills, whip the butter for about 2 minutes until light. Add the brown and regular sugar and cream together with the butter for 2-3 more minutes. Beat in the eggs one at a time, then oil, lemon juice, and vanilla, incorporating each completely. With the mixer on low, incorporate flour mixture into mixing bowl in 3 batches, alternating with milk. Near the end you may need to resort to a wooden spoon or rubber spatula for incorporation. Finally, fold in the reserved rhubarb with any liquid it produced while resting.

Pour batter into prepared pan. Smooth the batter slightly and rap pan against the counter to settle it. Bake 60-65 minutes, or until an inserted skewer comes out clean. Remove pan to cooling rack for about 10-15 minutes. When cool enough to handle, invert onto cooling rack. When cool enough to serve, plate and ice, or dust with powdered sugar, as desired.

-optional Coconut Icing-

1 1/2 c powdered sugar, sifted or passed through a fine mesh
4-? TB whole milk
1/2 c shredded coconut

Mix everything together until the desired consistency is reached. I say ? for the milk, because I don’t remember how much I used to achieve a drizzleable consistency for pouring over the cake that would still seize up properly when it cooled.  Drizzle attractively over the cake, let cool, slice gently, and serve.

Getting really into baking - just in time for the height of summer, haw.

I thought we’d missed rhubarb season this time around, but it turned out I was just under a misconception about when the season is. A bunch of rhubarb in our CSA share this week and a bunch last week meant we had to branch out from our usual best rhubarb cake recipe for maybe the first time ever. If we get more next week I’ll make a third cake.

Exceptional Rhubarb Bundt Cake

3 1/2 - 4 c chopped rhubarb (1/2” chunks)
2 TB sugar
3 c unbleached flour
1 TB baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 c butter, softened
1 c brown sugar
3/4 c sugar
4 large eggs
1/2 c neutral oil (canola, vegetable…)
3 TB lemon juice
2 tsp vanilla
1/2 c whole milk
Powdered sugar or coconut icing, optional (as below)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter and flour a 3 qt Bundt pan, and set aside.

Toss the chopped rhubarb with 2 TB sugar and set aside.

Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl. Set, similarly, aside.

In a large bowl, using a hand mixer or some serious whisking skills, whip the butter for about 2 minutes until light. Add the brown and regular sugar and cream together with the butter for 2-3 more minutes. Beat in the eggs one at a time, then oil, lemon juice, and vanilla, incorporating each completely. With the mixer on low, incorporate flour mixture into mixing bowl in 3 batches, alternating with milk. Near the end you may need to resort to a wooden spoon or rubber spatula for incorporation. Finally, fold in the reserved rhubarb with any liquid it produced while resting.

Pour batter into prepared pan. Smooth the batter slightly and rap pan against the counter to settle it. Bake 60-65 minutes, or until an inserted skewer comes out clean. Remove pan to cooling rack for about 10-15 minutes. When cool enough to handle, invert onto cooling rack. When cool enough to serve, plate and ice, or dust with powdered sugar, as desired.

-optional Coconut Icing-

1 1/2 c powdered sugar, sifted or passed through a fine mesh
4-? TB whole milk
1/2 c shredded coconut

Mix everything together until the desired consistency is reached. I say ? for the milk, because I don’t remember how much I used to achieve a drizzleable consistency for pouring over the cake that would still seize up properly when it cooled. Drizzle attractively over the cake, let cool, slice gently, and serve.

Tags: recipe dessert